Asparagus, two ways!

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Asparagus for breakfast and lunch?  Yes please!

I’m a big fan of batch cooking.  I like to roast or grill a big bunch of asparagus, then use it throughout the week, if it lasts that long (usually doesn’t, truth be told).  Well, I got a little carried away with it, but it turned into a good thing: asparagus for breakfast and lunch.  It was incredibly easy, which is really a requirement for me, since I tend to go from zero to starving in a very short amount of time, so quick meals really help keep the hanger to a minimum!

I grilled a bunch of asparagus, then made a quick breakfast with an egg on top.  I was tempted to put both the asparagus and egg on avocado toast, but alas, the hanger won out, and I just ate it as pictured 🙂  Still good!

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Wait for it…

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Runny yolk with grated parmesan and asparagus spears!

Then lunchtime rolled around, and I wanted to use the ridiculous amount of leftover asparagus, so I used my veggie peeler and shaved it into these pretty little strips, then tossed it with lemon juice, olive oil, feta, and pine nuts.  I had only grilled the asparagus for a minute or two on each side, so it was still nice and crunchy, and it worked well in the salad.

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All that’s here is 3 stalks of shaved asparagus, a tablespoon each of pine nuts and feta cheese, 2 teaspoons of lemon juice, and a teaspoon of olive oil.  Enjoy!

Cape Gooseberries, Two Ways!

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If you got cape gooseberries in your bag this week and weren’t sure what to do with them, I’ve got you covered!

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These pretty little gems look like yellow-orange cherries, and they have a similar texture, but with lots of tiny seeds inside. Go ahead and eat the seeds though! Their oils are the source of lots of antioxidants, and the berries as a whole are a good source of vitamins A and C.

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If you’re thinking, “that’s nice, but what do I do with them,” again, I have you covered! I actually have you covered twice because I have two ways to use them, both sweet and savory. They actually lend well to both uses, as the flavor is slightly tart but not overwhelmingly so.

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The first use was in a salad with this week’s sweet and spicy greens mix! I used that as my base, then added the gooseberries, some cashews, a sprinkle of feta, some avocado, and a little lemon juice, and it was mmm mmm good. The combination of lemon with the greens helps your body absorb the iron in the greens better, and it’s also pretty tasty, so dig in!

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The second was in a crumble.  Three cheers for dessert!

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I took my favorite blueberry crumble recipe, and instead of blueberries, I halved the gooseberries and let them macerate in some sugar for a few minutes.

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Then I mixed up my crumble topping (2 Tbsp flour, 2 Tbsp brown sugar, 2 Tbsp oats, 1.5Tbsp butter), and put it on top, then baked in a 375 degree oven for 40 minutes. That topping made enough for two individual gooseberry crumbles, and they were deeeeelicious.

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Comment below and let us know how you like to use gooseberries!

How to Revive Wilted Lettuces and Greens

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I am guessing I’m not alone in this, so tell me if it sounds familiar: you order greens from HH because you have a solid week of healthy meals planned, and you’re feeling good.  You order your produce from HH, and then wait excitedly for your delivery day.  Delivery day comes, and you put everything in the fridge.  Somehow, life happens, and when you get to the greens, with visions of yummy salads dancing through your head, your greens are…less than appetizing, shall we say?

This happens to me more than I’d like to admit!  The greens dry out a bit in the fridge, then they are limp and sad looking when you get to them.  No mold, nothing scary growing on there.  Just limp!
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BUT wait!  Don’t throw them out!  You can absolutely revive them with a little TLC and some ice water, and here is how that might go:
So I had some kale and fresh arugula in my fridge.  I planned on making an arugula grapefruit salad with goat cheese and pistachios.  I was pumped.  I picked up the arugula bunch, and it promptly fell to the side limply when I did.  Sadness.  Start by cutting off the ends of the dried out/limp greens.
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Then fill a big bowl or pan with water and some ice.
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Toss your greens in there, and swish them around, making sure the bottoms, where you cut, are underwater.
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Let them hang out for a good 15-20 minutes.
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Fish the leaves out of the ice bath, and let them drip onto a paper towel.  VOILA!  Crisp, fresh, crunchy arugula leaves, perfect for my grapefruit salad!
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Beets: A Faster Cooking Method and Quick Salad Recipe

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Do you follow Homtown Harvest on Instagram? You should! There are a lot of fun photos about life on the farm, one of which inspired this post!

Beets are, in my opinion, a misunderstood vegetable. They have a reputation for being a pain to make, taking forever to cook, and they even stain clothes/cutting boards/hands. If any of these complaints sounds like something you’d say, you are in luck!  This post will show you how to make a quick and easy beet salad with just a few ingredients, and in much less time than roasting will take. I even have a hack for getting the skin off and chopping beets without getting your hands covered or stained with beet juice!

Here is the salad. It’s so easy; just chopped beets, slices of fresh avocado, some fresh scallions, soy sauce, and sesame seeds.

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While roasting is a delicious option, you can also cook beets just like you would boil potatoes. It takes about 25 minutes (versus 45-60 minutes for roasting) and a pot of water often heats faster than an oven, in my experience.

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Just pop these pretty beets in the pot of boiling water and let them hang out until they are fork tender, approximately 25-30 minutes, depending on how big the beets are.  The bigger they are, the longer they will take.

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You should be able to do this with a fork in each beet when they are done:

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25 minutes of cooking time?  My impatient self loves it!

Then comes the part that is often messy: peeling the beets and chopping them up. I used to scrub my hands with hot water and soap to get the color off of my skin and fingernails until I realized I could just use a plastic baggie (or kitchen gloves, if you have them) to keep my hands clean but still give me a grip on the beets. It’s great!

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To put together this salad of healthy fats and vitamin-rich beets, simply take the chopped beets and arrange them with avocado slices. To get the avocado out of its skin while keeping its shape, just run your finger along the outer edge of the avocado, and it will slide right out.

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Top with 1 chopped scallion, 1 tsp. soy sauce drizzled over the salad, and then sprinkle with ½ Tbsp. sesame seeds. Enjoy!
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